Steve Cran gives NGO stakeholders a field briefing on the village zone permaculture design strategy.

“My system of the “5 rings of sustainability” is adapted from permaculture for community development. From tribal people to aid officials this system makes sense. In each ring we know many “best practices” that will improve that community or household. The rings are interconnected.”

Steve Cran

Steve Cran on village zone permaculture design strategy

Village Zone Design Strategy – Extreme Permaculture Food Security in Uganda with Steve Cran from Permaculture Cooperative on Vimeo.

In the new village garden, set-up by Steve on his arrival, he draws in the dirt, with a stick, the basic 5 zone permaculture strategy. He explains how the basic unit of food security is the home food and medicinal garden, and how this expands out through the village to the hunting lands, with the outermost zone being the “eco-zone” for regeneration and wildlife.

For more on Extreme Permaculture: Steve Cran first blog on arrival in Uganda, Warrior Permaculture, Everything is Growing

Steve also gives advice: Going into Haiti ? Earthquakes, Tsunami, War – Extreme Permaculture Veteran Steve Cran on Haiti, Uganda, Aceh, Australia and Timor

7 Responses to “5 rings of sustainability – Extreme Permaculture with Steve Cran”

  1. Antonio says:

    Hi
    thanks for posting this videos!
    Unfortunately the audio is disturbed with some background noises
    and it is somewhat hard to follow Steve’s speach (especially for not native English speakers)
    It would be great if some english subtitles could be provided.
    I’d also like to contribute spanish subtitles once the english ones
    are in place.
    All the best and thanks so much for your great work (both pc-tv folks and Steve Cran)
    Antonio

    • niccolo says:

      hi Antonio, good suggestion. will try to get to that in the next couple of days. we are also working on improving the audio. hopefully by next week. will get back to you regarding translation/subtitles..

  2. Antonio says:

    Hi Niccolo
    please let me know when there are news on this subject (subtitles)
    at my private email (which I think you can read, being the site manager)
    I was actually thinking that I could organize some spanish subtitling
    by means of giving work to people offering this service through a local currency
    that is developing here in Barcelona, so I could have someone do it on a paied for basis, which can make sure things get done, but … I’ll need to get enough credit there first. Well it’s just an idea for the moment
    All the best
    Antonio

  3. ew_keane says:

    I contacted the Indiana State Grange. They said that I should go to the pancake breakfast at the local Grange, held on Sundays from 730am to 1230pm, last Sunday of the month.
    I intend to relay to them the ideas of outfits like Midwest Permaculture, and of John Hantz of Hantz Farms of Detroit.
    Here is about the Grange;
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_National_Grange_of_the_Order_of_Patrons_of_Husbandry
    http://www.nationalgrange.org/
    It seems to me that members of The Grange ought to know something about Permaculture, as they still keep an office open in DC. It could be a good home for Permaculture.
    Need seeds? check this out;
    http://www.nationalgrange.org/memberbenefits/Seed.htm

  4. Antonio says:

    Hi
    just wandering how to apply the 5 rings in a situation where the closest tap/well is 10 or 20 km away, which villagers have to walk every day or so in order to get those few liters of water the consume daily.
    Steve is suggesting to create gardens wherever there is a drip of water, but this is kinda far away for building a garden, isn’t it? Apparently this seems to be a quite common situation too. How to start in such a situation?
    Cheers
    Antonio

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