Feb 032014

Who Owns the Future? is a visionary reckoning with the effects network technologies have had on our economy. Lanier asserts that the rise of digital networks led our economy into recession and decimated the middle class. Now, as technology flattens more and more industries—from media to medicine to manufacturing—we are facing even greater challenges to employment and personal wealth.

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But there is an alternative to allowing technology to own our future. In this ambitious and deeply humane book, Lanier charts the path toward a new information economy that will stabilize the middle class and allow it to grow. It is time for ordinary people to be rewarded for what they do and share on the web.

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Jaron Lanier, groundbreaking computer scientist and infectious optimist, is concerned that we are not making the most of ourselves. In Who Owns the Future? he tellingly questions the trajectory of economic value in the information age, and argues that there has been a fundamental misstep in how capitalism has gone digital. For Lanier, late capitalism is not so much exhausted as humiliating: in an automated world, information is more important to the economy than manual labour, and yet we are expected to surrender information generated by or about ourselves – a valuable resource – for free.

And yet one of the triumphs of Lanier’s intelligent and subtle book is its inspiring portrait of the kind of people that a democratic information economy would produce. His vision implies that if we are allowed to lead absorbing, properly remunerated lives, we will likewise outgrow our addiction to consumerism and technology. Lanier’s New World is founded on hard, fulfilling work. He concedes that such a radical reorganisation of worth will demand from us new levels of maturity, discipline and collective responsibility – but then who said dignity should be downloadable for free?

The Guardian

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Sep 042013

A union can make a big difference to people’s perceptions of a job. For UK staff you can find out which unions may be relevant to your job at www.worksmart.org.uk/unionfinder

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The film takes place on both a ravaged Earth and a luxurious space habitat called Elysium. It explores political and sociological themes such as immigration, transhumanism, health care and class issues.

Although set in 2154, Elysium’s director argues that it is a comment on the contemporary human condition. “Everybody wants to ask me lately about my predictions for the future,” the director says, “No, no, no. This isn’t science fiction. This is today. This is now”

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Join us September 25th – October 9th for another exquisite opportunity to learn about permaculture principles and techniques. With renowned international teacher Starhawk, as well as Palestinian permaculture specialist Murad Al Khuffash, join us in gaining skills and a certification in Permaculture- while experience the culture, food and traditions of beautiful Palestine! More at MardaFarm.com

Murad: Planting the Seeds of Hope
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Starhawk at Harvard Divinity School
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Urban Permaculture Institute of San Francisco Summer 2013

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Watermelon Man is a 1970 American comedy-drama film directed by Melvin Van Peebles. Written by Herman Raucher, it tells the story of an extremely bigoted 1960s white insurance salesman named Jeff Gerber who wakes up one morning to find that he has become black. The premise for the film was inspired by Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis and John Howard Griffin’s autobiographical Black Like Me.
Van Peebles’ only studio film, Watermelon Man was a financial success, but Van Peebles did not accept Columbia Pictures’ three-picture contract, instead developing the independent film Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song. The music for Watermelon Man, written and performed by Van Peebles, was released on a soundtrack album, which spawned the single “Love, that’s America”. In 2011, that single received much mainstream attention when videos set to the song and featuring footage of Occupy Wall Street became viral.

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Aug 062013

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Why are the bees dying?

Dr. Mario Martinez discusses The Mind Body Code

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